Gorets in the Russian Service during the Caucasian War (1801–1864): Mediator, Marginal, Traitor
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Keywords

Caucasus
Caucasian War
North Caucasian frontier
Identity
Russian Empire
Caucasian line
Highlanders in the Russian service
Caucasian Corps
Historical Memory
North Caucasus

How to Cite

1. Urushadze A. Gorets in the Russian Service during the Caucasian War (1801–1864): Mediator, Marginal, Traitor // Journal of Frontier Studies. 2020. № 4 (5). C. 127-151.

Abstract

The article examines the features of the life and work of the Caucasian mountaineers in the Russian service during the Caucasian War (1801-1864). At the same time, the article examines the service trajectories of not only major historical figures, but also the fate of lesser-known figures. It is through their example that one can see the functional roles fixed by the empire, the presence / absence of mental boundaries, the perception of the imperial service by local communities. The aim of the study is a historical and anthropological analysis of the service of highlanders in Russian military-political institutions based on sources of personal origin and record keeping materials. The study suggested that for the highlanders in the Russian service, the priority was the motive for raising their own status within the local community, rather than advancing the general imperial ladder of ranks and ranks. Highlanders often hoped with the help of the empire to raise their own political and / or moral prestige among their compatriots. If the service of the empire did not lead to an increase in the “communal” status or, on the contrary, undermined and burdened the reputation of the highlander, then he began to doubt the correctness of his choice. This approach allows us to describe and explain the frequent cases of a change in political identity, “unexpected” betrayals and escapes of highlanders from Russian service, which are filled with the history of the Caucasian War.

https://doi.org/10.46539/jfs.v5i4.251
pdf (Русский)

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