Cultural Memory of Migrants and the Host Society in the Epoch of Multiculturalism
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Keywords

migration
cultural memory
multiculturalism
cultural boundaries
politics of memory
museums
history books
collective memories
historical consciousness

How to Cite

1. Buller A., Linchenko A. Cultural Memory of Migrants and the Host Society in the Epoch of Multiculturalism // Journal of Frontier Studies. 2020. № 2 (5). C. 27-59.

Abstract

The subject of this article is the analysis of the peculiarities of the relationship between the cultural memory of migrants and the host society taking classic immigration countries (USA, Canada) and EU countries as an example. The article is devoted to the analysis of the relationship between the memory of migrants and the host society at the informational, communicational, institutional and value levels. It was shown that in the era of multiculturalism, cultural memory is an important symbolic resource of the relationship between migrants and the host society. At the same time, cultures of migrants’ memories are more likely to fit into the framework that the host society provides them and which are reflected in the specifics of the politics of memory of state and non-state actors. In multicultural society, the conflict memories of migrants are not pushed out to the periphery of cultural relations, but rather, they receive the right to declare themselves. At the institutional level, a tendency to consider the memory and history of migrants as a secondary experience in educational literature has been identified. The key problem continues to be the representation of the historical experience of migrants in major European museums, as well as the peculiarities of attitudes towards the memory of migrants in museums of post-socialist countries of Eastern Europe. In the USA and Canada, the tendency of nationalization of migrants’ memories by museums, the desire to include them into a large national history was revealed. The value level demonstrates a significant departure from the ideas of ethnocentrism in turning to the past. At the same time, actualization of the values of cultural memory of migrants was considered in the context of common attitude towards ethnic and religious minorities, which reflects the general heterogeneity of cultural memory abroad.

https://doi.org/10.46539/jfs.v5i2.202
pdf (Русский)

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